Critical policy failures of the Canadian online Census

Critical policy failures of the Canadian online Census - I have seen this issue covered in a variety of locations, and is being discussed in a number of different forum. On Thursday there was a Newsforge article by Bruce Bayfield with the headline "Canadian online census discriminates against FOSS". A few citizens have written letters to their member of parliament about this embarrassment to Canada.
I thought I would weigh in on this issue as a technical, policy and security consultant.

TLUG Meeting

2006-04-11 19:30
2006-04-11 21:30
Etc/GMT-5

Special Feature

We'll also be having a short talk on TCCP, a non-profit colocation
project in the GTA.

Main Topic

Slony-I Replication for PostgreSQL

Speakers

Christopher Browne

Description

Slony-I is an asynchronous replication system for PostgreSQL supporting
multiple replicas "fed" by a single master. Special capabilities include
the ability to shift the master node (to support maintenance), to
abandon the master in favor of a replica in case of failure, as well as
to add additional replica nodes.

Essential topics covered include:

* What is Slony-I?
* What are the sorts of use cases where it works well? Where is

Unix Unanimous meeting

2006-04-12 18:45
2006-04-12 21:00
Etc/GMT-5

The next meeting of Unix Unanimous will be held at 6:45 pm on
Wednesday 12 April 2006, in room BA 5256 of the Bahen Centre for
Information Technology at 40 St. George Street, on the University
of Toronto campus.

Unix Unanimous is an informal gathering of people interested in
Unix and related topics. There are no fees or membership
requirements, and the meeting is open to all. Participants
typically include Unix professionals, students, and hobbyists.

This message will be repeated on the Monday before the meeting.
If there are any items for the agenda, email u-u-admin@unixunanimous.org

Reduced cost LPI exams at Ottawa Open Source Weekend

2006-05-14 10:00
2006-05-14 14:30
Etc/GMT-5

LPI exams 101 and 102 will be delivered at the Open Sourve Weekend in Ottawa.

We only have LPI 101 and 102 avaliable at this time. It appears that 201 and 202 are under revision.

Date and time:

University of Ottawa, May 14, 2006

Seating 1
10:00 to 11:30

Seating 2
13:00 to 14:30

An Introduction

Let me introduce myself to the CLUE community. My name is Jim Elliott and I am the advocate for Open Computing (including Linux and Open Source) at IBM Canada Ltd. (which covers Canada and the Caribbean). I have been working pretty much full-time on Linux since mid-1998. First as the launch manager for Linux on IBM mainframes for the Americas and then since January of 2002 in my current role.

My web site is at ibm.com/vm/devpages/jelliott where you will find copies of presentations I have made at public events recently on Linux and Open Source.

LinuxWorld Free Show Passes

As an exhibitor at the LinuxWorld show and conference in April, CLUE can make available free show passes (PDF format) to all our members and supporters. Just follow the link and print out the pass (or just follow its instructions if you are registering online).

20 Years Ago

February 1986. I was in Oakland, CA, and Lou Katz, founding president of USENIX, asked me whether I was interested in becoming Executive Director of the organisation. He showed me the ad and the job description. I applied. I was interviewed by Debbie Scherrer, Steve Johnson, and Tom Ferrin. I got the job.

The next three years were the most fun I can imagine anyone having while getting paid for it. We were running 4.2BSD and then 4.3BSD on a VAX 780. Early in 1987 we got a SUN and a 3/60 and two 3/50s.

In 1987, I sponsored the first LISA; the first POSIX workshop; the first C++ workshop. We began the publication of Computing Systems. We sponsored the founding of UUNET by Rick Adams and Mike O'Dell.

Linux Caffe

If you live in or visit Toronto, I suggest you stop at the Linux Caffe, 326 Harbord, right on the corner of Christie.

davamundo, the proprietor/perpetrator, wrote me after the HLUG meeting, and I took the bus over the other day. It was very cold and very windy, but inside it was quite cozy and the barista served me a fine double espresso.

I noticed a lot of books (for those who like to read and sip), there's wireless, and the menu looked OK, though I didn't sample anything.

But I'm into supporting penguins -- even in the Northern Hemisphere.

Check it out!

Software patents

There has been a lot of discussion about software patents and how evil they are over the past months. Even without the insanities concerning RIM and those concerning "business methods," there has been a lot to really dislike.

But nothing has gotten my back up the way patents (in the US) have been distributed on mathematics.

No, I'm not kidding.

If you studied advanced algebra or calculus, you know that Fourier analysis is an important and often-employed method. It is based on the notion that complex wave forms can be approximated by a sum of sinusoids, each of a different frequency. There are a number of techniques that have been developed to perform analyses employing computers.